Walter Sweet’s WW1 Grave

As part of the World War 1 centenary the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) have been erecting new signs and replacing old WW1 headstones around the country as well as encouraging communities to write up the stories of their war dead.

GD has written up and spoken about our WW1 War Dead in Chitterne, including one, Walter Henry Sweet, who is not buried here in the village, nor on the battlefields abroad, he is buried in a Welsh village called Bryngwyn in Monmouthshire.

bryngwyn church
Bryngwyn St Peter church and graveyard

The Parish Council of Bryngwyn has also been trying to piece together Walter Sweet’s story. It has not proved to be an easy task for either our parish or theirs, as Walter is quite an elusive character. The entry in the Bryngwyn burial register states that he was a soldier who died ‘on the road’ and was buried on Sunday August 25th 1918.

Sweet, Walter Henry burial 1918

There are questions that immediately arise from this entry: What was Walter doing in Wales, how exactly did he die and why was his body not brought back to Chitterne?

Walter was a farrier by trade who worked shoeing horses at Chitterne Racing Stables in 1911, and in WW1 as a driver in the 2nd Reserve Horse Transport (RHT) section of the Army Service Corps based at Woolwich. Sadly his army records appear to have been lost, at least, they have not come to light, but presumably as a serving soldier he was in Wales on a mission. H of Bryngwyn PC has suggested that he was acquiring horses for the army, which sounds a reasonable assumption especially as he was staying at Little Cross Farm in Bryngwyn.

As to how he actually died, again H has asked around her community and says that:

CWGC could not help in the circumstances of his death but one of the Grand Dames of the village recalls from her youth (which would have been 20/30 years after his death) that he had been walking along the road and had been hit by a car which killed him (I knew there was a car accident but not how it caused his death).  I can only presume he was in the area on war business (obtaining horses).

The third question of why his body was not brought back is probably a question of economics and the time of year when his death occurred. He and his second wife Emma, whom he married in 1911, lived at 10 Townsend, with Emma’s two children, Harry and Gladys, by her first husband Henry Grant. Emma lived for another 20 years, she passed away in 1938. Walter was survived by his two sons John Harold and Walter Henry Sweet from his first marriage in 1899 to Alice Elizabeth Prince in Bromley, they remained in Kent. Walter’s local nickname was ‘Sugary’ for obvious reasons. It was the fashion in Chitterne in those days for the men of the village to be nicknamed, but that’s another story.

White, Edith; Smith, Elsie; Sweet, Emma; Smith, Isabel & Pearce, Sophia 1927
Emma Sweet, Walter’s widow is the woman in the centre of this photo taken in Townsend in 1927. The others are L to R: Edith White, Elsie Smith (on the horse), Emma Sweet, Isabel Smith and Sophia Pearce.

The good news is that CWGC are to replace Walter’s old headstone in Bryngwyn, which wrongly named him as W A Sweet, with a brand new one in the next 9 to 12 months.

 

 

 

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Walter Sweet’s WW1 Grave

Grandmother’s Necklace

sid fob

may ingram
May wearing the fob

This fob belonged to my grandmother May, she wore it after she was widowed in 1921. So I never knew my grandfather Sid. He died of kidney failure when he was only 34 years old. I never knew my grandmother either, she died aged 53, three years before I was born. I have just a few of their things, left me by my father, but no memories.

I can only imagine what they were like as people from looking at photographs and handling their possessions. I like to think we would have got along fine. They were both  small. According to his army records Sid was the same height as me and my father, 5 feet 3½ inches. May looks to be even smaller. We probably would have had interests in common and agreed on a lot of things. Both lived and worked in the gloving trade in Westbury. Sid was a glove cutter and May a glove machinist at home. Sid was a trade unionist who recruited members from other local glove factories.

sid&mayingram
Sidney Albert Nelson and Agnes May Ingram nee Papps
sidney ingram
Sid in army uniform WW1

My mother was convinced she had met Sid when he came recruiting to her glove factory in Warminster, but the numbers don’t add up. If my mother started work aged 14 in 1922 and Sid died in 1921, how could that have happened? Perhaps she started working earlier. I don’t think my mother would have joined a union anyway, coming from her conservative family.

 

That’s the other thing, Sid and May might have provided a counter-balance to my other stricter grandparents in Warminster. My grandmother Sarah was bedridden by the time I knew her, but ruled the house from her bed in the living room with a rod of iron. Or rather a walking stick which she whacked me across the back of my legs with, for what misdemeanour I fail to remember. No love lost there.

maypappsingram
May much later, still wearing the fob

No, Sid and May’s was a love match. May wore the photo of Sid on a chain around her neck because she loved and missed him. I just wish I could have known her.

 

Grandmother’s Necklace

Sutton Veny Book

A very good new local history book was published recently about Sutton Veny, a village not too far from Chitterne, in the Wylye Valley. I have just finished reading it and it has some excellent chapters including some on the early history of the area, as well as useful maps of the village. I am envious of these. They were lacking in the Chitterne book!

sutton veny book

The book is a joint effort by the members of the Sutton Veny History Group and is for sale on the village website. I found the link on the blog page. I recommend it if you enjoy reading local history, or if you have a friend who does, it would make a great present. It is already being reprinted. I had one of the last of the first imprint.

Horse Racing - Cheltenham Festival - Cheltenham Gold Cup - Cheltenham Racecourse
Gay Donald being ridden by Tony Grantham

I’m sure there are many more connections with our village, but one I spotted straight away was Gay Donald, the racehorse who won the Cheltenham Gold Cup in 1955. He was owned by a Sutton Veny farmer named Philip Burt and trained by Jim Ford, who in 1957 came to live and train horses in Chitterne, bringing Gay Donald with him.

Jeanne George told me that everyone loved Gay Donald, he was such a friendly horse. One of his huge iron shoes hung for many years outside the King’s Head, where Jeanne’s parents had been landlords.

Sutton Veny Book

Aerial View of Village

Can you help pinpoint the year this aerial photo was taken? The pumping station is there and so is the old Village Hall, so sometime between 1988 and 1998. Glebe Farmhouse appears to be newly constructed, but I don’t know when that was built, and St Mary’s House doesn’t exist. Any ideas anyone?

village 199-
Aerial view of Chitterne of unknown date

Thanks to AS for the picture.

Aerial View of Village

Raymond Poolman 1933-2017

One of our old time villagers, Raymond Poolman, sadly passed away today, the 19th November 2017, aged 84 years.

ray poolman
Raymond Poolman

Ray had lived his whole life in Chitterne apart from a brief spell of National Service in Germany in the early 1950s. He was born at The Round House, the youngest son of William Poolman and Elsie, née Drewitt. Like his father he worked in farming at The Manor for the Wallis family, until he was made redundant, and then for the REME at Warminster.

Ray was a lifelong Baptist and met his wife Freda through Baptist connections in Dorset. They were married at Alderholt Congregational Church in 1962, and moved into their new bungalow, in Chitterne, next door to Ray’s parents, in January 1963.

Both Freda and Ray played the piano and organ. Ray had been taught to play the piano by Olive Burt née Polden, as a child. He played for Baptist services at the chapel in Bidden Lane and when that chapel closed he and Freda held Baptist services themselves at the Village Hall in Chitterne for many years. Ray represented the Baptist Church on the Village Hall Committee. Later, the couple attended and played for services in Tilshead until that chapel also closed.

Ray and Freda have been our neighbours for the last 41 years. In all that time their garden has never looked less than immaculate. They were both great gardeners and grew many vegetables and flowers. Freda does still. After he retired Ray took up gardening for other villagers, and was often to be seen mowing the grass at Chitterne House.

There have been Poolmans living in Chitterne since the 18th century, all descended from John Poolman who married Betty Eyles at Chitterne All Saints Church in 1757. Ray was one of the last descendants living here, but not quite the last.

 

Raymond Poolman 1933-2017

The Limbricks of Manor Farm

manor farm (1)
The Limbricks thrashing at Manor Farm

Some time before World War II the Defence Land Commission of the War Department (WD) of the British government bought up a lot of land and properties in Chitterne including Chitterne Farm, the Racing Stables and Manor Farm. Manor Farm was run by a tenant farmer under WD ownership for about 60 years. In the 1980s the land and barns were amalgamated with Chitterne Farm and the farmhouse sold off. So today we have Chitterne Farm West, owned by the Ministry of Defence, and Manor Farmhouse privately owned.

manor farm (2)
The reverse of the photo above – William Limbrick’s written description

By 1939 the Limbrick family ran Manor Farm and lived in the farmhouse. The tenant, William Isaac Hatherill Limbrick, was born in Gloucestershire, but he and his wife Emma Annie née Cave had spent several years farming in Canada before coming to Chitterne. Their children, Tom and May, were born and grew up in the wilds of Saskatchewan.

According to BL, who paid a visit to Chitterne a short while ago, his father Tom and aunt May were almost feral by the time they set out for England. But Tom ran the farm here and appears to have been well-liked in the village. He offered the re-formed Cricket Club a field to play on in February 1939, married Marguerite Willcox of Tytherington, Gloucestershire in 1941 and lived in Brookside (Brook Cottage) with her. Their three children were baptised in Chitterne Church.  Tom joined Wiltshire Flying Club and gained his flying certificate in 1946. May married Ralph Carey of Potterne in 1942 at Chitterne Church.

manor farm (3)
William Limbrick’s invoice

The Limbrick family left Chitterne after the war in about 1948 and returned to their roots in Gloucestershire. William died in Sherborne, Gloucestershire in 1964, Tom died only 5 years later, aged 52 in Cheltenham.

The Limbricks of Manor Farm

Chitterne from the Air

On a hot Saturday in June this year our village dwellings were photographed from a helicopter flying at 800 feet. Last week, like many other villagers, I was offered a copy of the digital photograph of my house and garden. This is it.

round house 2017

The photographer had done his homework and spun a good yarn to effect a sale, but there was no need from my point of view, I was a willing customer. But some of his information was worth telling.

Do you know, he said, that in 1994 Chitterne and Shrewton were the last two villages in the UK to be photographed from the air using the wet film method? No, I didn’t. Do you have a copy of the photo taken then? Yes, I have, and showed it to him. Here it is.

round house 1994

A bit faded from sunlight after 23 years hanging opposite the front door, but now I know why. It was taken using film later developed in a dark room. Your two villages, he said, are quite famous in the aerial photography world.

Chitterne from the Air