Dated Buildings

The Dated Buildings Project currently being undertaken by Wiltshire Buildings Record led me to think of the dated buildings we have in Chitterne. Off the top of my head there are at least six in the village, ranging from the elaborate dated inscription to the lowly scratched in plaster type.

Last weekend’s open gardens provided a good opportunity to photograph a few of them. Chitterne House has more than one. Over the front door is a square stone tablet.

chitterne house datestone
HEALTH AND PEACE THIS HOUSE INCREASE 1635 GD

This stone tablet is thought to have been re-sited from its previous position, perhaps when the entrance was moved from Back Lane to the Tilshead Road? I have no idea who GD was.

Other dates have been scratched in the stones either side of the front door at Chitterne House.

chitterne house 1686
1686 to the left of the front door of Chitterne House
chitterne house 1752
1752 below the 1686
chitterne house 1783
1783 to the right of the front door

The stable at Chitterne House also has an inscribed datestone.

chitterne house stable
This stable was built by Robt Michell Eq 1774

Near Chitterne House, and built on part of the garden, is Pitts Cottage. This cottage is thought to have housed the Chitterne House gardener in days gone by. It was built by Richard Hayward, owner of Chitterne House in 1870. It also has a datestone.

pitts cottage 1870
Richard Hayward’s Pitts Cottage dated 1870

The Long family left their mark on the village. Just across Pitts Lane from Pitts Cottage is Pitts House, built by Walter Hume Long in 1891.

pitts house 1891
Walter Hume Long’s Pitts House 1891

An earlier member of the Long family, Richard Penruddocke Long, left his mark on Chestnut Cottages in Bidden Lane in 1874.

chestnut cottages 1874
Richard Penruddocke Long’s Chestnut Cottages, an early example of building entirely in concrete, see my archived blogĀ  “Researching Concrete Houses in Chitterne” dated 23 Sept 2014

The Old Baptist Chapel has quite a large stone memorial tablet.

baptist chapel 1903
The Baptist Chapel burnt down and was rebuilt in 1903

Inscriptions can be a lot less fancy than those above, but be just as interesting and useful. A name and date scratched in the plaster of the chimney breast in the loft at my house was probably done when the roof was renewed or changed in 1882 by Poldens, the builders.

round house 1882
Polden the builder signed his work in 1882 at the Round House

It was some time before we spotted this simple 1880 scratched on a brick at the entrance to the old stable at the Round House. What could it signify? A rebuild, a repair?

stable 1880
1880 scratched in red brick on the stable door jamb at the Round House

If your house in Chitterne has a date inscription, please leave a comment, or contact me on the ‘About’ page.

 

Dated Buildings

Arch Cottages

arch cotts (2) small
Recent photo of 20 and 22 Townsend, formerly 20, 21, 22 and 23 Arch Cottages

The Arch was the hump-backed bridge over the Cut (Chitterne Brook) in Townsend. Arch Cottages were the four terraced cottages numbered 20, 21, 22 and 23 alongside the Arch.

arch 2 small
The Arch bridge with the cottages far left in 2017

During the second World War the bridge was flattened and the narrow road widened either by Italian prisoners of war (Chitterne Chat May 1992) or by conscientious objectors (see blog: Who Lined The Cut? dated 23 Jan 2017). Unfortunately I have no photograph of the old bridge, but it looks, from this old map, as if the road at that time made a sharp bend where it crossed the bridge.

arch 1850
Map of about 1850 shows the Arch bridge passing over the Cut with Arch Cottages centre. Note the path in front of the cottages. Apologies for the photo, this is only a small part of a huge original map

The cottages appear on maps as far back as 1826. In 1882 the four cottages were owned by Joseph Dean of Chitterne Farm, but the gardens behind and alongside were part of the Chitterne estate owned by Walter Hume Long of Rood Ashton. According to a schedule of Corn Rents dated 1882 Joseph Dean was letting the cottages to shepherd Henry Farley, and others, but the schedule is probably out of date because Henry Farley had left Chitterne by 1881. The census that year has Thomas Coles, William Grant, Frederick Grant and John Furnell and families living there. Thomas and Frederick were shepherds, and William and John were agricultural labourers, most likely employed at Chitterne Farm.

The four cottages continued to be occupied by farm workers in 1891. By 1901 and 1911 one cottage was uninhabited. The vicar, Rev. John Canner, recorded Sidney and Ellen Parrett and Harry and Ellen Beaumont living in two of the cottages in 1925; and then we have no further information as the names of the occupants in the 1939 register are redacted. Presumably the cottages, as part of Chitterne Farm, were under War Department ownership by then.

20townsend 2012
20 Townsend in 2012

By the time George and Jessie Clarke came to live here in 1966 some of the cottages were condemned. The Clarks bought number 20 first and later the other three when they came up for sale. They made 20 and 21 into one dwelling for themselves, moving in 1971, and 22 and 23 into another to rent out. George Clark died in 1976 and Jessie in 2005. The two cottages, 20 and 22, remained in the same family until quite recently and have since been renovated again.

arch cottages
22 Townsend before recent renovations
Arch Cottages