1896 Sale of Chitterne Properties: part 1

Following on from my last blog here are the details of the properties that were offered for sale by Walter Hume Long in 1896 from a copy of the auction particulars found at 98 Chitterne. Most of the properties were in St Mary’s parish, apart from a couple in All  Saints. Some were sold, some were not, and some were withdrawn from the sale.

Lot number 1: The White Hart Inn.

white hart inn sale 1896
The inn is now White Hart House

The tenant at the time was William Poolman, a member of the very large Poolman family that had lived in Chitterne since at least 1737. He is usually known as William Meade Poolman to distinguish him from other Williams in the family. In 1865 he married Sarah George, niece of Thomas George previous tenant of the inn, and ran the White Hart Inn from then until Sarah died in 1906. He was a carrier and landlord of cottages as well as an innkeeper and owned quite a few cottages scattered around the village. He has appeared in my blogs before as landlord of 8 cottages in Bidden Lane. As the village carrier he ran a regular service to the local towns and markets.

whitehart2
The White Hart Inn under William Poolman’s tenancy, note his name above the door

The inn was purchased at auction for £2000 by Margant Bladworth (or Margan & Bladworth, it is not clear) according to the pencilled note on the excerpt above. I have not been able to find out who that was. It may have been an agent for a brewery as the same person/s also purchased the King’s Head Inn.

Lot number 2: The King’s Head Inn.

kings head sale 1896
Part of the King’s Head’s ground is a part of the St Mary’s graveyard and 101 Chiiterne

The tenant of the King’s Head in 1896 was George Brown. I have very little idea who he was. His name appears in the Pig Club ledger for providing a Pig Club supper in 1895, 1896 and 1897, but not in any parish records, neither does he appear to be related to the Browns who taught at the school at that time.

kings head thatch
The King’s Head at the turn of the century

The King’s Head was purchased for £1350 at auction by the same person/s who bought the White Hart Inn, Margant Bladworth or Margan & Bladworth, possibly agents for a brewery.

Lot number 3: Bridge Cottage.

bridge cottage sale 1896

The sitting tenant, Miss Annie Compton, purchased Bridge Cottage for £55 at auction. She had been living there since before 1891, and stayed until her death in 1931. She was one of the first women in the country to be elected to serve on a council. In 1894 she was elected to the Rural District Council representing Chitterne, and remained so for almost 40 years. She was also a member of the Board of Guardians of Warminster Workhouse until she was 90 years old.

Comptons-at-King's-Head1
Bridge Cottage is centre behind the horse and cart

Bridge Cottage is named for the bridge over the Chitterne Brook, which it fronts. The bridge was always known as Compton’s Bridge by the locals in those days. It was hump-backed until the second World War, when it was flattened to allow for easier movement of military transport. American troops who were billeted in Chitterne made use of the Bridge Café run by Henry Slater and Lily Poolman at Bridge Cottage during the war.

 

 

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1896 Sale of Chitterne Properties: part 1

Admiral Napier’s Gift

Admiral Charles Lionel Napier of Chitterne House was leaving the village and, as president of the Hut committee, wanted to give something to the Hut as a momento of the happy time he and his wife had spent in the village. He offered, on 3rd September 1926 if the committee was agreeable, to have a wireless set installed in the Hut for the use of the villagers.

hut small
The Village Hut by Ernie George

For newcomers to the village, the Village Hut was an ex- army World War One wooden hut that was erected by the villagers in 1921-22 for use as a Village Hall. It stood in Bidden Lane behind the White Hart Inn on what is now part of Well Cottage garden.

 

The committee accepted the offer gratefully and by 15th October had an agreement with Ushers Brewery Limited (who owned the White Hart) to erect an aerial in their field, at a fee of sixpence a year, (this was probably the field where Clockhouse Cottages now stand), with the proviso that the pole was to be removed at seven days notice from the brewery.

1926-12-01-The Wireless World
An example of a wireless set of 1926

The committee also decided that: “Two members were to be on duty each week to facilitate the use of the wireless by the villagers. At least two performances to be open to the general public and one for children each week. Members on duty to arrange the programme to be given.” Wireless terminology had yet to catch up with the science!

“One of the days should be Sunday for the religious service, and the Men’s Club should have the use of the set when not otherwise required on condition that they provide light and heat on the occasions when used by the public.” By the following year the conditions were more relaxed: “any person wishing to listen to any particular item at any time should make application to the member on duty.”

All this extra footfall at the hut meant that the cleaner was to be paid 1 shilling per week during the winter months for the extra work caused by the use of the wireless. “It was decided to hold a Whist Drive and Dance at an early date to provide funds for the upkeep of the wireless and other hut expenses.”

accumulator
Accumulator 1926

“Members of the committee reported that the wireless was become faint, and it was thought that a new H.T. Battery was required.” This was in December 1926 and the secretary was asked to look into the matter and purchase another if needed. The Men’s Club took the matter into their own hands and purchased an Exide H.T. accumulator for the wireless.

Power for the wireless came at first from dry H.T. batteries, but these needed replacing every 2 months at athe cost of £1. Later on the committee realised that accumulators would be cheaper as they could be re-charged every 3 months at a cost of 2 shillings and 6 pence (12½p) . An accumulator was an early type of battery containing acid. These needed to be transported very carefully and charged very slowly or dire results would ensue. The accumulators were taken to the Warminster Motor Company for charging at first but that soon proved too difficult and by 1928 they were being re-charged in Wylye.

In 1927 the wireless was  “not very satisfactory” and the Warminster Motor Company were asked to put it in order. The following year 1928 the set had broken down and been examined and repaired by Mr. H. Down. It was not working again in 1929 and the committee must have been wondering if they had been offered a poisoned chalice! A sub-committee was formed to consider the question of having the set rebuilt.This was done and the set was re-installed in March 1929 and “appeared to be satisfactory.” But the “bills in respect of same had not yet been received.” The treasurer reported that the balance in the kitty was 18 shillings and 2 pence. It was decided to hold a Whist Drive and Dance at an early date in aid of the funds.

After renewing the wireless licence in 1930 there is no mention in the Village Hut Committee Minute Book of  Admiral Napier’s gift until 1934, when it was decided not to renew the licence, and to notify Ushers Brewery Limited that the aerial pole would be removed.

 

 

Admiral Napier’s Gift