1896 Sale of Properties: part 2

Part two of the auction of properties in Chitterne held on 12 September 1896.

Lot number 4: The Grange (known as The Lodge in 1896) and Holmrooke House.

The Grange, or The Lodge as it is here named, included the house and the large outbuilding which is now Holmrooke House

The annotation alongside lots 4 and 5 tells us that in 1896 both lots were withdrawn from the sale. The estate may not have been sold until Lt. Col. Richard Morse bought it in about 1918. Walter Hume Long had kept this estate for his own use and let it to his relatives in the 1880s, and then to the Misses Hitchcock, formerly of All Saints Manor Farm, in the early 1890s, but by 1896 the tenant was William Beak, previously a landlord tenant of the King’s Head Inn.

The Grange about 1913. I don’t have any old photographs of the outbuildings.

Besides The Grange itself, the estate included another substantial building which housed the coaches, stables and servants quarters. The estate has had a few name changes over the years. In 1896 it was The Lodge, as we have seen, by 1901 it was known as The Old Lodge, presumably because by then the present Chitterne Lodge had been so named by Walter Hume Long, who used it as his country retreat in the early 1900s. By 1911 it was being called The Grange. In October 1924 it was renamed Holmrook Grange by the new owner Ernest Lowthorpe-Lutwidge after his birthplace Holme Rook Hall. The name stuck during Miss Margaret Frances Awdry’s ownership from 1932 to 1949 and Group Capt. Leo Maxton’s from 1949 to 1973.  It was after the Maxtons died  that the outbuilding was separated from the Grange. Allan Fair purchased The Grange and the outbuilding was bought by Paddy O’Riordan and converted by 1975 to the Long House, now renamed Holmrooke House by the present owners. For more on Holmrook Grange:

https://suerobinsonmeuk.wordpress.com/2016/07/29/holmrook-grange/

Lot number 5: The paddock behind the Church, Village Hall and Bow House.

Church paddock

This paddock was withdrawn from the auction, it was being used by Mr Beak, the tenant of lot number 4, in 1896.  The measurement equates to almost three quarters of an acre and stretched from the back of the church to the back of Bow House. GD told me that Leo Maxton sold the part of the paddock behind Bow House to his father in the 1950s, so perhaps the whole paddock was owned by the person who owned the Grange estate up to that point.

Lot number 6: The Round House.

The Round House

This is my house. It was not sold at the auction but purchased the following year for £70 by Miss Alice Mary Langford, niece of Frederick Wallis of The Manor. Alice was a tutor, she lived here for the next 20 years. Before that, from 1880 onwards, the Round House was being used by the constabulary to house the local village policeman. I am not going into more of the house history here, it’s available on the web, but according to recently discovered letters at 98 Chitterne, it seems that there was some thought to demolish the house after the death of Charles Morris in 1879.

The Round House is in the distance, to the right. This is the only old photograph I have, it’s from the 1950s I would guess.

More on the history of the Round House:

http://www.suerobinson.me.uk/rh-history/index.html

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1896 Sale of Properties: part 2

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